SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

American Sign Language Interpreting

SL101   American Sign Language I     4 hours
An introduction to American Sign Language and the deaf community. Instruction is given on the basic skills needed in the production and comprehension of American Sign Language (ASL). Course work includes the manual alphabet, numbers, basic sentence structure, conversational skills, culturally appropriate behaviors, and ASL Grammar. Students learn the importance of facial expression and body language as grammatical indicators. Students also learn the importance of conceptually accurate signs.Initial emphasis is given to receptive language skills. Students are introduced to the American deaf culture and participate in deaf community events. This class is taught using spoken English and AmericanSign Language.

SL102   American Sign Language II     4 hours
Continued study of American Sign Language (ASL) and the Deaf community. Instruction is given on additional types of sentence and discourse structure. The course includes continued development of expressive and receptive skills while conversational signing skills are emphasized through interactive exercises. The course considers relevant issues within the American deaf culture and includes participation in deaf community events. This class is taught exclusively in ASL without voice. (Prerequisite: SL101)

SL103   ASL for Native Users     3 hours
This class is specially designed for students who use ASL as a native language but may be unfamiliar with the syntactical rules of the language.  Successful completion of this class will serve as a substitute for ASL I and ASL II.  Upon successful completion of this course, students will be placed into ASL III.

SL201   American Sign Language III     4 hours
An intermediate study of American Sign Language and the Deaf community. The course is designed to improve the student’s expressive and receptive signing skills with focus on expressive skills. It provides students with additional ASL vocabulary and idiomatic/colloquial expressions. It provides instruction on ASL usage as well as grammatical structures for complex sentences emphasizing semantic accuracy and discourse strategies. Special focus is given to the use of classifiers, non-manual signals, and use of space. It includes instruction on self and peer analysis. Advanced study of the history and culture of the Deaf is considered. Students are required to participate in deaf community events. (Prerequisite: SL102)

SL202   American Sign Language IV     4 hours
A continued intermediate study of American Sign Language and the Deaf community. The instruction of American Sign Language vocabulary and idiomatic/colloquial usage of signs is continued. It also continues instruction on fluency of ASL expressive skills through a variety of exercises, but shifts it attention to improving a student’s receptive skills. It includes further and more advanced instruction on self and peer analysis. It considers historical and contemporary perspectives of language, education, legislation, and social and political aspects of deaf people. This is done from an anthropological and socio-cultural point of view analyzing the similarities and differences to collectivistic and individualistic cultures worldwide. Students are required to participate in deaf community events. (Prerequisite: SL201)

SL203   ASL Grammar     3 hours
A remedial study of ASL Grammar for students who fail to achieve a minimum score of 2.5 on the American Sign Language Proficiency Interview. This course helps strengthen ASL grammatical concepts. University credit is not offered for this class.

SL204   Finger spelling and Numbers     3 hours
This course will provide further instruction related to finger spelling and numbers.  Students will be able to recognize words, numbers, and lexicalized finger spelling finger spelled at different speeds within a range considered to be standard by the instructor. Students will also be able to demonstrate proper articulation, speed, word configuration, and distinction between words.

SL220   Deaf Culture     3 hours
An introduction to American Deaf culture. This course studies the types and causes of deafness and its effect on the individual and family. It considers cultural identity, core values, group norms, organizations, and significant contributions made by deaf people to the world. It also considers historical and contemporary perspectives of language, education, legislation, and social and political aspects of deaf people. This is done from an anthropological and socio-cultural point of view analyzing the similarities and differences to collectivistic and individualistic cultures worldwide.

SL221   Deaf Ministry     3 hours
A study in establishing and/or administering a deaf ministry in a local church in the United States or on the mission field. The class will discuss the various types of deaf ministry as it relates to Interpreting Ministry, Deaf Ministry, and Deaf Church. Class content will include interpreting in the religious setting, deaf visitation, deaf evangelism, deaf children and youth programs, deaf camp, sign language programs (plays, concerts, etc.) and sign language choirs. The students will also consider several mission boards that are involved in deaf ministry. (Prerequisite: SL201)

SL222   Cross Cultural Experience     1 hour
Students will participate in a cross-cultural experience working with the deaf. Students will prepare a detailed summary of the experience. (Elective)

SL240   Basics of Interpreting     3 hours
An introduction to sign language interpreting designed for students with a demonstrated ability and fluency in American Sign Language. It considers a historical perspective of the field and provides instruction on current and emerging trends. It introduces the theory and skills of the interpreting/transliterating process, roles and responsibilities of the interpreter, cultural implications for the interpreter, various credentialing processes, along with instruction on ethics and business practices of the professional interpreter. (Prerequisite: SL201; Co-requisite: SL202)

SL301   American Sign Language V     3 hours
An advanced study of expressive and receptive American Sign Language discourse. Students analyze and enhance their own use of ASL features such as register, spatial mapping, and coherence. The class focuses on the most common communication situations. Students engage in spontaneous, informal conversations, discussion topics, and debate and present formal ASL presentations on a variety of topics. (Prerequisite: SL202)

SL302   Interpreting in Technical Settings     3 hours
An introduction to the various potential environments in which an interpreter might serve and corresponding specialized vocabulary. The interpreting settings covered are as follows: oral, medical, mental health, legal, deaf/blind, theatrical, video, platform, vocational, and small group. The specialized vocabulary covered is as follows: American government, English, math, science, medical terminology, computer, and strong language. Lab fee required. (Prerequisite: SL240 and SL202; Co or Prerequisite: SL301 and SL339)

SL320   Introduction to Deaf/Blind Interpreting     3 hours
This course presents an overview of the lives and perspectives of deaf/blind people. It provides an explanation of the various roles and relationships of support service providers and interpreters within the deaf/blind community. Basic level knowledge and experiential activities, meetings, socializing, and working with deaf/blind people in a variety of settings will be provided. (Prerequisite: SL102) (Elective)

SL339   Introduction to the Interpreting Process     3 hours
Provides instruction regarding the interpreting process and techniques for rendering dynamic equivalent interpretations. Instruction also includes information regarding self and peer analysis. (Prerequisite: SL240 and SL202; and Co Requisite SL301)

SL341   English to ASL Interpreting     3 hours
In depth study and practice of interpreting spoken English to American Sign Language (ASL) or other sign language systems. This is a laboratory-based class that provides for the development of interpreting skills required in a variety of settings. Focus is given to equivalent message content, vocabulary, register choice, and cultural adaptations. It includes further and more advanced instruction on self and peer analysis, enhancing the students’ English to ASL interpreting skills and preparing them for interpreter credentialing. (Prerequisite: SL339 and SL301)

SL342   Educational Interpreting     3 hours
An overview of deaf education in the K-12, and post-secondary mainstreamed settings. The course considers the history of deaf education and the best practices in educational interpreting. It examines legal and ethical considerations specific to the field. It aids in the preparation for the written and performance portions of the Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment. (Prerequisite: SL240 and SL202; and Co Requisite: SL339 and SL301)

SL344   Interactive Interpreting     3 hours
In depth study and practice of interpreting in interactive settings. This is a laboratory-based class that provides for the development of interpreting skills required in a variety of settings. Focus is given to equivalent message content, vocabulary, register choice and cultural adaptations. It includes further and more advanced instruction on self and peer analysis, enhancing the students’ interactive interpreting skills and preparing them for interpreter credentialing. (Prerequisites: SL3393 and SL3013)

SL345   ASL to English Interpreting     3 hours
In depth study and practice of interpreting from American Sign Language (ASL) or other sign language to spoken English. This is a laboratory-based class that provides for the development of interpreting skills required in a variety of settings. Focus is given to equivalent message content, vocabulary, register choice and cultural adaptations. It includes further and more advanced instruction on self and peer analysis, enhancing the students’ ASL to English interpreting skills and preparing them for interpreter credentialing. (Prerequisites: SL339 and SL301 with a grade of B or better)

SL400   ASL Linguistics     3 hours
A study of the structure of ASL. The course considers the phonological, morphological, and syntactical structure of ASL. It also considers the socio-linguistic rules concerning ASL in the deaf community and their applications and implications to the profession of interpreting. Through lectures, readings, in-class activities and homework, students will learn to analyze languages and discover their patterns and structures. (Co/Prerequisite: SL301)

SL420   Interpreting in the Vocational Rehabilitation Setting     3 hours
In this class, students will be introduced to Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) as a system and gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the challenging field of VR interpreting and the variety of rewarding opportunities it offers. Topics include VR and the VR system, interpreting for VR consumers and Deaf professionals, ethical decision-making, and interpreting observation/practice.

SL421   Performance Interpreting     3 hours
This course is designed to teach students the skills needed to interpret music and drama in a visually artistic manner. Topics will include technical aspects such as lighting and sound, assignment of characters, script analysis and transcription and character development. This course emphasizes appropriate use of conceptually accurate signs, facial expression, movement, role-shifting, and rhythm.

SL450   Private Instruction     1-3 hours
Private instruction is given to senior Sign Language Interpreting majors. This class is taken as an independent study. (Elective)

SL460   Deaf Literature     3 hours
A study of the literature of the deaf community in relationship to other world literatures. Students study a variety of genres including humor, drama, poetry, narratives, folklore, and language as art. (Co/Prerequisite: SL301)

SL480   Research in ASL/Interpreting     3 hours
This course is designed to introduce students to the process of conducting, analyzing, and reporting qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods research related to American Sign Language, Deaf Culture or Sign Language Interpreting.  The class will result in an original contribution to the discipline and reach beyond the traditional curriculum.

SL488   Interpreting Fieldwork     9 hours
A practical application of the skills learned in the interpreter training program. Students work under the supervision of certified interpreters in a variety of settings. The requirements include observation of credentialed interpreters, actual interpreting experience, classroom seminar, professional development activities, one-on-one mentoring with a certified interpreter, and an advanced study of the RID Code of Professional Conduct. Students also complete a paper and electronic portfolio. (This class is graded passing/not passing). (Prerequisites: SL341, SL345, and SL344)

SL495   Special Topics     1-3 hours
An in-depth study in a specialized area. (Prerequisite: Department chair approval) (Elective)

SL496   Special Topics     1-3 hours
An in-depth study in a specialized area. (Prerequisite: SL495) Department chair approval) (Elective)

SL497   Directed Deaf Studies I     1-3 hours
A specialized, self-directed study considering an aspect of interpreting in the deaf community. (Prerequisite: Department chair approval) (Elective)

SL498   Directed Deaf Studies II     1-3 hours
specialized, self-directed study considering an aspect of interpreting in the deaf community. (Prerequisite: SL497) A Department chair approval) (Elective)